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Texas Legislature 2013 Committee Assignments 114th

Analysis

Legislative Metrics

Read our 2017 Report Card for Cruz.

Ideology–Leadership Chart

Cruz is shown as a purple triangle ▲ in our ideology-leadership chart below. Each dot is a member of the Senate positioned according to our liberal–conservative ideology score (left to right) and our leadership score (leaders are toward the top).

The chart is based on the bills Cruz has sponsored and cosponsored. See full analysis methodology.

Ratings from Advocacy Organizations

Committee Membership

Ted Cruz sits on the following committees:

  • Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation
    • Chair, Subcommittee on Space, Science, and Competitiveness
    • Member, Subcommittee on Aviation Operations, Safety, and Security
    • Member, Subcommittee on Communications, Technology, Innovation, and the Internet
    • Member, Subcommittee on Consumer Protection, Product Safety, Insurance, and Data Security
  • Senate Committee on the Judiciary
  • Joint Economic Committee
  • Senate Committee on Armed Services
  • Senate Committee on Rules and Administration

Enacted Legislation

Cruz was the primary sponsor of 6 bills that were enacted:

View All »

We consider a bill enacted if one of the following is true: a) it is enacted itself, b) it has a companion bill in the other chamber (as identified by Congress) which was enacted, or c) if about one third or more of its provisions were incorporated into bills that were enacted (as determined by an automated text analysis, applicable beginning with bills in the 110th Congress).

Bills Sponsored

Issue Areas

Cruz sponsors bills primarily in these issue areas:

International Affairs (33%)Immigration (16%)Government Operations and Politics (14%)Health (11%)Taxation (9%)Crime and Law Enforcement (7%)Science, Technology, Communications (5%)Energy (4%)

Recent Bills

Some of Cruz’s most recently sponsored bills include...

View All » | View Cosponsors »

Voting Record

Key Votes

Cruz’s VoteVote Description
Yea H.R. 1892: Further Extension of Continuing Appropriations Act, 2018; Department of Defense Appropriations Act, 2018, the SUSTAIN Care Act of 2018; Family First Prevention Services Act.; Honoring Hometown ...
Feb 9, 2018. Motion Agreed to 71/28.
This bill became the vehicle for passage of funding for the federal government through March 23, 2018, to avert a government shutdown that would have occurred on February 9, 2018 had this bill not been enacted. The bill was introduced as the Honoring Hometown Heroes ...
Nay H.R. 5325: Legislative Branch Appropriations Act, 2017
Sep 28, 2016. Bill Passed 72/26.
Nay H.R. 22: Developing a Reliable and Innovative Vision for the Economy Act
Dec 3, 2015. Conference Report Agreed to 83/16.
H.R 22, formerly the Hire More Heroes Act, has become the Senate’s vehicle for passage of the Developing a Reliable and Innovative Vision for the Economy Act or DRIVE Act (S. 1647). The DRIVE Act is a major bipartisan transportation bill that would authorize funding ...
Nay H.R. 22: Developing a Reliable and Innovative Vision for the Economy Act
Jul 30, 2015. Bill Passed 65/34.
This vote turned H.R 22, originally the Hire More Heroes Act, into the Senate’s vehicle for passage of the Developing a Reliable and Innovative Vision for the Economy Act or DRIVE Act (S. 1647), a major bipartisan transportation bill, and the Export-Import Bank Reform and ...
Nay S. 1177: Every Child Achieves Act of 2015
Jul 16, 2015. Bill Passed 81/17.
The Every Child Achieves Act is a bipartisan educational policy reform bill that would expand state responsibility over schools, provide grants to charter schools, and reduce the federal test-based accountability system of the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB). The bill was referred to the ...
Yea H.R. 5771 (113th): Tax Increase Prevention Act of 2014
Dec 16, 2014. Bill Passed 76/16.
Nay H.R. 3979 (113th): Carl Levin and Howard P. “Buck” McKeon National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2015
Dec 12, 2014. Motion Agreed to 89/11.
This bill became, most recently, the vehicle for the passage of the defense authorization (spending) bill for fiscal year 2015. The bill was originally introduced by Rep. Lou Barletta as the Protecting Volunteer Firefighters and Emergency Responders Act. It was passed by the House in ...
Nay H.J.Res. 124 (113th): Continuing Appropriations Resolution, 2015
Sep 18, 2014. Joint Resolution Passed 78/22.
Nay H.R. 4302 (113th): Protecting Access to Medicare Act of 2014
Mar 31, 2014. Bill Passed 64/35.
Section 212 of this bill pushed back the deadline to implement the ICD-10 code set to October 1, 2015. The Cutting Costly Codes Act of 2013, which would prevent ICD-10 from being implemented at all without further Congressional approval, has been introduced in House and ...
Nay H.R. 3304 (113th): National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2014
Dec 19, 2013. Motion Agreed to 84/15.

Missed Votes

From Jan 2013 to Mar 2018, Cruz missed 218 of 1,534 roll call votes, which is 14.2%. This is much worse than the median of 1.4% among the lifetime records of senators currently serving. The chart below reports missed votes over time.

Show the numbers...

Time PeriodVotes EligibleMissed VotesPercentPercentile
2013 Jan-Mar9211.1%62nd
2013 Apr-Jun7611.3%36th
2013 Jul-Sep4312.3%73rd
2013 Oct-Dec801316.3%95th
2014 Jan-Mar9300.0%0th
2014 Apr-Jun1231411.4%90th
2014 Jul-Sep5411.9%61st
2014 Nov-Dec961313.5%93rd
2015 Jan-Mar1352115.6%98th
2015 Apr-Jun853237.6%99th
2015 Jul-Sep52713.5%91st
2015 Oct-Dec672029.9%97th
2016 Jan-Mar383694.7%98th
2016 Apr-Jun794455.7%98th
2016 Jul-Sep3412.9%61st
2016 Nov-Dec1218.3%90th
2017 Jan-Mar10133.0%86th
2017 Apr-Jun5411.9%62nd
2017 Jul-Sep5300.0%0th
2017 Oct-Dec11732.6%79th
2018 Jan-Mar50510.0%92nd

Primary Sources

The information on this page is originally sourced from a variety of materials, including:

Ted Cruz is pronounced:

ted // krooz

The letters stand for sounds according to the following table:

LetterSounds As In
D dday
E ebed
K kking
OO oosoon
R rrag
T ttop
Z zzebra

Capital letters indicate a stressed syllable.

This article needs to be updated. Please update this article to reflect recent events or newly available information.(March 2017)

The Committee on Rules, or (more commonly) Rules Committee, is a committee of the United States House of Representatives. Rather than being responsible for a specific area of policy, as most other committees are, it is in charge of determining under what rule other bills will come to the floor. As such, it is one of the most powerful committees and is often described as "an arm of the leadership" and as the "traffic cop of Congress." A rule is a simple resolution of the House of Representatives, usually reported by the Committee on Rules, to permit the immediate consideration of a legislative measure, notwithstanding the usual order of business, and to prescribe conditions for its debate and amendment.[1]

Jurisdiction[edit]

When a bill is reported out of one of the other committees, it does not go straight to the House floor, because the House, unlike the United States Senate, does not have unlimited debate and discussion on a bill. Instead, what may be said and done to a bill is strictly limited. This limitation is performed by the Rules Committee.

When a bill is reported out of another committee with legislative jurisdiction, it is placed on the appropriate House Calendar for debate. Common practice, though, is for bills reported from committees to be considered in the Rules Committee, which will decide for how long and under what rules the full body will debate the proposition.

Consideration by the full body can be in one of two forums: the Committee of the Whole, or on the floor of the full House of Representatives itself. Different traditions govern whether the Committee of the Whole or the House itself will debate a given resolution, and the Rules Committee generally sets the forum under which a proposition will be debated and the amendment/time limitations for every measure, too. For instance, there might be a limit on the number or types of amendments (proposed changes to the bill). Amendments might only be allowed to specific sections of the bill, or no amendments might be allowed at all. Besides control over amendments, the rule issued by the Rules Committee also determines the amount of speaking time assigned on each bill or resolution. If the leadership wants a bill pushed forward quietly, for instance, there might be no debate time scheduled; if they want attention, they might allow time for lengthy speeches in support of the bill.

Between control over amendments, debate, and when measures will be considered, the Rules Committee exerts vast power in the House. As such, the majority party will usually be very keen on controlling it tightly. While most House committees maintain membership in a rough proportion to the full chamber (If the majority party controls 55% of the House, it will tend to have 55% of committee seats), membership on the Rules Committee is disproportionately in favor of the majority party.

History[edit]

The Rules Committee was formed on April 2, 1789, during the first Congress. However, it had nowhere near the powerful role it has today. Instead, it merely proposed general rules for the House to follow when debating bills (rather than passing a special rule for each bill), and was dissolved after proposing these general rules. These general rules still have a great impact on the tone of the House floor today.

The Rules Committee, for a long time, lay dormant. For the first fifty years of its existence, it accomplished little beyond simply reaffirming these rules, and its role was very noncontroversial. On June 16, 1841, it made a major policy change, reducing from 2/3 to 1/2 the fraction of votes needed in the House to close debate and vote on a bill.

In 1880, the modern Rules Committee began to emerge from the reorganization of the House Committees. When the Republican party took over the House in the election of 1880, they quickly realized the power that the Rules Committee possessed. One member, Thomas Brackett Reed (R-Maine), used a seat on the Rules Committee to vault himself to the Speakership, and gained so much power that he was referred to as "Czar Reed".

In the 1890s and 1900s, Reed and his successor, Joseph Gurney Cannon (R-Illinois) used the Rules Committee to centralize the power of the Speakership. Although their power to place members in committees and perform other functions was limited by a forced rule change in 1910, the Rules Committee retained its power. However, it ceased to function as the personal project of the Speaker, as it had originally; instead, as the seniority system took root, it was captured by a coalition of conservative Democrats and Republicans. This state of affairs would continue until the 1960s.

In 1961, Speaker Sam Rayburn (D-Texas), acting on the wishes of the new PresidentJohn F. Kennedy and the Democratic Study Group, introduced a bill to enlarge the committee from 12 members to 15, to decrease the power of the arch-conservative chairman, Howard W. Smith (D-Virginia). The bill passed, 217 votes to 212. However, it was only partially successful; the Rules Committee continued to block legislation including civil rights and education bills.

In the 1970s, however, the Rules Committee was firmly under the command of the Speaker once again. As before, its primary role is to come up with special rules, to help or obstruct the chances of legislation reported to it.

Members, 115th Congress[edit]

Majority PartyMinority Party
RepublicanDemocratic
  • Pete Sessions, Texas's 32nd, Chair
  • Tom Cole, Oklahoma's 4th, Vice Chair
  • Rob Woodall, Georgia's 7th
  • Michael C. Burgess, Texas's 26th
  • Doug Collins, Georgia's 9th
  • Bradley Byrne, Alabama's 1st
  • Dan Newhouse, Washington's 4th
  • Ken Buck, Colorado's 4th
  • Liz Cheney, Wyoming's at-large

Sources: H.Res. 6 (R), H.Res. 7 (D).

Subcommittees[edit]

The Rules Committee operates with two subcommittees, one focusing on legislative and budget matters and the other focusing on the internal operations and procedures of the House.

Source: House Committee on Rules Subcommittees

Chairs, 1849–1853 and 1880–present[edit]

The Committee on Rules was first a standing committee of the House, during the 31st and 32nd Congresses (1849–1853). From 1853 until 1880, the panel reverted to being a select committee (as it had been before 1849).[2]

Between 1880 and the revolt against Speaker Cannon, in March 1910, the Speaker of the House also served as Chairman of the Rules Committee.

Historical members and subcommittees[edit]

Members, 114th Congress[edit]

Majority PartyMinority Party
RepublicanDemocratic
  • Pete Sessions, Texas's 32nd, Chairman
  • Virginia Foxx, North Carolina's 5th, Vice Chair
  • Tom Cole, Oklahoma's 4th
  • Rob Woodall, Georgia's 7th
  • Michael C. Burgess, Texas's 26th
  • Steve Stivers, Ohio's 15th
  • Doug Collins, Georgia's 9th
  • Bradley Byrne, Alabama's 1st
  • Dan Newhouse, Washington's 4th

Sources: H.Res. 6 (Chairs), H.Res. 7 (D), H.Res. 17 (R) and H.Res. 22 (D).

Subcommittees[edit]

The Rules Committee operates with two subcommittees, one focusing on legislative and budget matters and the other focusing on the internal operations and procedures of the House.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^"Committee on Rules". U.S. House of Representatives, Committee on Rules. Retrieved November 3, 2006. 
  2. ^A Pre-Twentieth Century look at the House Committee on Rules, by Walter J. Olezek (House of Representatives, Rules Committee Democrats website; accessed January 16, 2011)
  3. ^United States Congress. "Kaufman, David Spangler (id: K000021)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved January 16, 2011. 
  4. ^United States Congress. "Jones, George Washington (id: J000222)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved January 16, 2011. 
  5. ^United States Congress. "Randall, Samuel Jackson (id: R000039)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved January 16, 2011. 
  6. ^Committee on Rules – A History (House of Representatives, Rules Committee Democrats website; accessed January 16, 2011 (confirms Randall was Chairman)
  7. ^United States Congress. "Keifer, Joseph Warren (id: K000048)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved January 14, 2011. 
  8. ^United States Congress. "Carlisle, John Griffin (id: C000152)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved January 14, 2011. 
  9. ^United States Congress. "Reed, Thomas Brackett (id: R000128)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved January 14, 2011. 
  10. ^United States Congress. "Crisp, Charles Frederick (id: C000908)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved January 14, 2011. 
  11. ^United States Congress. "Henderson, David Bremner (id: H000478)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved January 14, 2011. 
  12. ^United States Congress. "Cannon, Joseph Gurney (id: C000121)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved January 14, 2011. 
  13. ^United States Congress. "Dalzell, John (id: D000016)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved January 14, 2011. 
  14. ^United States Congress. "Henry, Robert Lee (id: H000516)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved January 14, 2011. 
  15. ^United States Congress. "Pou, Edward William (id: P000474)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved January 15, 2011. 
  16. ^United States Congress. "Campbell, Philip Pitt (id: C000097)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved January 14, 2011. 
  17. ^United States Congress. "Snell, Bertrand Hollis (id: S000652)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved January 14, 2011. 
  18. ^United States Congress. "Bankhead, William Brockman (id: B000113)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved January 14, 2011. 
  19. ^United States Congress. "O'Connor, John Joseph (id: O000030)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved January 14, 2011. 
  20. ^United States Congress. "Sabath, Adolph Joachim (id: S000001)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved January 14, 2011. 
  21. ^United States Congress. "Allen, Leo Elwood (id: A000138)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved January 14, 2011. 
  22. ^United States Congress. "Smith, Howard Worth (id: S000554)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved January 14, 2011. 
  23. ^United States Congress. "Colmer, William Meyers (id: C000645)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved January 14, 2011. 
  24. ^United States Congress. "Madden, Ray John (id: M000039)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved January 14, 2011. 
  25. ^United States Congress. "Delaney, James Joseph (id: D000211)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved January 14, 2011. 
  26. ^United States Congress. "Bolling, Richard Walker (id: B000605)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved January 14, 2011. 
  27. ^United States Congress. "Pepper, Claude Denson (id: P000218)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved January 14, 2011. 
  28. ^United States Congress. "Moakley, John Joseph (id: M000834)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved January 14, 2011. 
  29. ^United States Congress. "Solomon, Gerald Brooks Hunt (id: S000675)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved January 14, 2011. 
  30. ^United States Congress. "Dreier, David Timothy (id: D000492)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved January 14, 2011. 
  31. ^United States Congress. "Slaughter, Louise McIntosh (id: S000480)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved January 14, 2011. 
  32. ^United States Congress. "Sessions, Pete (id: S000250)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved January 26, 2013. 

Further reading[edit]

  • Brauer, Carl M. "Women Activists, Southern Conservatives, and the Prohibition of Sex Discrimination in Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act", 49 Journal of Southern History, February 1983 online via JSTOR
  • Dierenfield, Bruce J. Keeper of the Rules: Congressman Howard W. Smith of Virginia (1987)
  • Dion, Douglas, and John D. Huber. "Procedural choice and the house committee on rules." Journal of Politics (1996) 58#1 pp: 25-53. online
  • Jenkins, Jeffery A., and Nathan W. Monroe. "Buying negative agenda control in the us house." American Journal of Political Science (2012) 56#4 pp: 897-912. online
  • Jones, Charles O. "Joseph G. Cannon and Howard W. Smith: an Essay on the Limits of Leadership in the House of Representatives" Journal of Politics 1968 30(3): 617-646.
  • Moffett, Kenneth W. "Parties and Procedural Choice in the House Rules Committee." Congress & the Presidency (2012) 39#1
  • Race, A. "House Rules and Procedure." in New Directions in Congressional Politics (2012): 111+
  • Robinson, James Arthur. The House rules committee(1963)
  • Schickler, Eric; Pearson, Kathryn. "Agenda Control, Majority Party Power, and the House Committee on Rules, 1937-52," Legislative Studies Quarterly (2009) 34#4 pp 455-491
  • Woods, Clinton Jacob, “Strange Bedfellows: Congressman Howard W. Smith and the Inclusion of Sex Discrimination in the 1964 Civil Rights Act,” Southern Studies, 16 (Spring–Summer 2009), 1–32.

External links[edit]